Archive for December, 2012

Drink with The Chief

The Chief, returns for its 10th anniversary production for a short run at the Pittsburgh Public Theater.

And in conjunction, at a special show on Sunday, January 6 there will be a beer and food tasting after the show.

The show starts at 7 p.m. and the tasting will begin around 8:30.

I went to the last special event the PPT did with Good People, and it was a lot of fun, if you can make it, call the theater to reserve your tickets.

Find out more here.

A holiday poem

It’s still the holiday season, so I don’t feel too bad posting this so late, but check out a fantastic poem over at The Pensblog.

And then cry because we still don’t have hockey.

A present of sorts

It’s usually not a good thing when Pittsburgh makes Yahoo’s Oddly Enough.  Here we are again:

Some residents of a Pittsburgh suburb have gift-wrapped something they hope will be gone by Christmas: a charred and abandoned house that burned nine months ago.

Amy Davis tells WPXI-TV  that residents put a big red bow on the house next door to hers, so Penn Hills officials will get moving on tearing it down. The house burned in March.

Part of me wants to go see the gift-wrapped house.  All of me hopes it is torn down before I have the chance to.

“Good People,” good beer

“Good People,” a comedy by David Lindsey Abaire, runs through the end of the week at the O’Reilly theater.  And on Friday, there will be a special night featuring the beer of Great Lakes Brewing, and food from some big names: Cookies & Critters, On Nom Bake Studio and the south side Pretzel Shop.

Tickets are $25 ahead of time, or $30 at the door.  Doors open at 7 p.m. for beer and food and the curtain rises at 8 p.m.

I’m not sure what beers they’ll have from Great Lakes, but I like pretty much everything they make (plus winter beers are my favorite, so it’s a good time to drink), so I’m excited.

Purchase tickets here (use code “LASTCALL”), and read City Paper’s review here.

Cheating for the charter schools

I found this story on Slog:

Schools must hit certain targets at every tested grade level to make AYP. But for a district to meet the benchmark, it needs only to hit targets in one of three grade spans: grades 3-5, 4-6 or 9-12.

Under Pennsylvania law, every charter school is considered its own district. So by using the grade span methodology, about 59 percent of charters made AYP — a figure that supporters touted, comparing it with the 50 percent of traditional schools that hit the target.

Yet only 37 percent of charters would have made AYP under the individual school method.

I’ve never been a fan of charter schools, they tend to wreck the financial system of public schools, bringing everyone down.  But I don’t know enough about the system to really be able to debate more than that.

Leave your thoughts in the comments.

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